Hawaii Island News, afternoon update, 27 September 2018


Accessed on 27 September 2018, 1326 UTC, Post #17115.

Source:  http://links.pacbasin.mkt4463.com

“Hawaii Business Magazine”, 27 September 2018.

Please scroll down to read your selections.

Comment: Here are today’s top Hawaii Island news stories from “Hawaii Business Magazine”, published in Honolulu, Hawaii.  Views expressed in this Hawaii news summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

HAWAI‘I ISLAND
Proposed rules for managing Maunakea lands draw fierce criticism
More than 30 people submitted verbal testimony about the proposed rules, which would prohibit certain activities and items on Maunakea land, require permits for certain other activities on the land and would allow an agent of UH to control access to the mountain at his or her discretion.Tribune-Herald.

Council member Ruggles puts Queen’s Hospital on notice
Jen Ruggles released a letter she sent notifying Queen’s Health Systems that it appears they may be violating the rights of protected persons. She wrote that after pressure to sever the Hawaiian government’s interest in Queen’s Hospital and no longer admit Native Hawaiians free of charge, the Board of Trustees amended the charter. In 1909, the phrase from the original 1859 charter “for the treatment of indigent sick and disabled Hawaiians” was replaced with “for the treatment of sick and disabled persons.” She said the change was made secretively. Big Island Now.

Residents say dairy continues polluting their town
The people of Ookala, a former sugarcane town downhill from Big Island Dairy on the rainy Hamakua coast, are very unhappy. They’ve formed a nonprofit organization called Kupale Ookala, which has partnered with the Center for Food Safety to take legal action over repeated spills and runoff of cattle manure, cattle urine and other waste. Civil Beat. 

At 96, Kona woman is tells Holocaust survival story to the world
As a teenager in Germany, Big Island resident Goldie Lefkowitz lived a middle-class life. But in the 1930s, when Hitler began persecuting Jews, the Nazis shut down her father’s tailor shop in Cologne. “They took it. They just padlocked it and that’s it,” she said. Lefkowitz’s life and the lives of other Jews in Germany changed dramatically. Hawaii News Now.


For the latest Hawaii Island, West Hawaii, Hawaii State, and local sports news, please check the blog sidebars and links.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today.

Until next time,

Russ Roberts

https://hawaiinewsdigest.net